Psalm 59

You have to love Psalms!  This is one of many that I have marked with repeated phrases.  The yellow and blue sections are great. The other highlighted sections are just similar thoughts. The shading was done by me for comparison.  

In my Bible, there is an introduction to this Psalm.  (This Psalm was copied from BibleGateway.com and is the New International Version.)  Apparently, at one time the introduction may have been the first verse.  It was written by David after the events of 1 Samuel 19: 11.  It would be fun to hear the actual tune that went with it when David wrote this song. Was it is up tempo or a slow mournful tune?

It is fair to say that David was not happy when he wrote it.  He was probably in his early twenties and not angry and fearful about what was being done to him!  Even in this very forceful wording, we find verse three, which is a shadow of the Pharisees and how they treated Jesus.  

New International Version (NIV) Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

On His Way to Jerusalem #2 and Heaven

I am borrowing the title of this post from my Easter post and I got that from Luke.  Luke also uses this idea for the third phase/block of Jesus’ ministry by saying He was getting ready to go to Heaven.  (This will not look polished because Word Press does not play nice when you import some things from Word.  This is more of a study than a “telling”.  I am trying to connect where Jesus was with the teachings and actions of others and focus on “kingdom”.)  Jesus’ movements and His teachings are very purposeful in this phase of His ministry as He is preparing the disciples for Easter/Passover and for the Book of Acts/Pentecost.  Matthew and Luke have different events in this time period, I will try to join them but that has proven hard.  One idea that might help join all the events is that the disciples (the Twelve) were not always by Jesus’ side in this time period.  Another fact is the Holy Land is not a huge area, several days of focused walking will get you from Jerusalem to Caesarea Philippi and Tyre and Sidon to the East Bank.   

From Matthew 13: 53 to 28: 20 there are eighteen times/parables that the term “kingdom” is used. (actual number of times it appears is higher, I counted groupings) I will add material from Luke and John when it seems right.  Some of this will be subjective because Luke adds many things not found in Matthew or Mark, John’s focus is just different! 

Matthew 13: 53– His hometown (Nazareth) – rejected as He taught in the synagogue – “prophet without honor” I have wondered if that is why He never went back to Bethlehem!  The mention of what happened to John the Baptist not only signals this is a different section of Jesus’ ministry but clears the stage for things to come.

Matthew 14: 13 – a solitary place – feeds the 5000 and walks on water.  The miracles reflect events of the Exodus and the march to Sinai (days to Pentecost) and Jesus’ authority over nature.

Matthew 14:34 – Gennesaret – Pharisees from Jerusalem asked about the Law (washing hands). Teaching on clean and unclean.

Matthew 15: 21 – the region of Tyre and Sidon.  This is as far west as Jesus traveled, it is also as far north as He went; Caesarea Philippi is about the same latitude north.  Jesus found “great faith” in a woman who the disciples wanted to send away.  She wanted mercy for her daughter’s healing.

Matthew 15: 29Sea of Galilee. Feeds the 4000.

Matthew 15: 39 – vicinity of Magadan, by boat– Pharisees wanted a sign from Heaven.

Matthew 16: 5 – crossed lake.  Yeast of Pharisees and Sadducees.

Matthew 16: 13 – Caesarea Philippi *Kingdom (2) * – Who I am, Peter’s confession, started explaining His suffering at Jerusalem, Peter’s rebuke, denying self 

Matthew 17: 1 – high mountain for Transfiguration.  This could be in Caesarea Philippi or “the mountain” in Galilee.  I vote for Galilee because of Jesus wanting them to go back there during the days of “counting the omer” or waiting on Pentecost.

Luke 10: 1 to 17: 11– My main interest here is that Jesus sends out seventy-two disciples to at least thirty-six towns.  Luke puts many parables/teachings in these chapters that may appear somewhere else in a different Gospels.

Matthew 17: 22 – they came together!  Matthew does not say any more than that!  This is why I put Luke 10 into the list.  Realizing that the disciples (the 12) may not have always been “right there” helped the possibilities and melding of the Gospel accounts.

This section is from the first post and overlaps a little. I will add some from Matthew for #8. 

  1. John 10: 22 has Jesus in Jerusalem at the Feast of Dedication or Hanukkah.  He makes the Jews mad so He “escapes”.
  2. Jesus goes to where John baptized on the east bank of the Jordan. John 10: 40.
  3. Bethany is Jesus’ next destination to raise Lazarus from the dead. John 11: 17
  4. Because of a plot to kill Him, He goes to a village called Ephraim that is in the desert.  John 11: 54 We would call it wilderness – English and Hebrew ideas on this topic are opposites of each other. 
  5. Capernaum– dealing with the Temple tax. Matthew 17: 24
  6. Samaria and Galilee border – healed ten lepers. Luke 17: 11
  7. Crosses the Jordan River to be on the east bank. Matthew 19: 1
  8. Crosses back to the west bank and goes to Jericho.
  9. Goes to Bethany/Bethphage and the Mount of Olives for the “Triumphal Entry”. Matthew 21: 1, Luke19: 28

    Jesus on the Donkey

Matthew 18 to 21 – There are seven references to the * kingdom* in this section of Matthew.  Six are by Jesus and one by “the mother of Zebedee’s sons” (James and John).  

Matthew 20: 17 – going up to Jerusalem.  He probably was on the east bank of the Jordan going to Jericho.  This period of time reflects Joshua’s entry into the Land and his Passover (#8).

Matthew 20: 29 – Leaving Jericho going to the Mount of Olives (#9) for His ride into Jerusalem.  Jesus only visited the Temple and then He left for Bethany (Mark 11:11). This is Palm Sunday, I will switch to days of the week so that it will be easier to visualize. 

Monday– To put this is context with Passover, the next four days are when the Passover lamb was separated, “inspected”, and taken care of before it became the main part of the remembrance of what God had done for the people.  I am also going to focus on where Jesus went during these days, not what He taught or said. The links will take you to another post that adds more to the story.  I will extend this section to the Ascension.  Jesus’ movements are scattered throughout the Gospels, so they are not in one place for reference.  Matthew 21: 12 – the Temple and back to Bethany.

Tuesday– Matthew 21: 18, Mark 11: 27 – to the fig tree and the Temple Court where He taught. Matthew has seven references to the *kingdom* on Tuesday; Luke has one.

Wednesday– Matthew 26: 6 – Jesus is in Bethany at the house of Simon the Leper.

Thursday– Matthew 26: 17 the Upper Room, (26: 30) Mt. of Olives/Gethsemane, (26: 57) Caiaphas house.  There is one reference to the *kingdom* during Jesus’ last supper; Luke has three.

Friday– Matthew 27:1 Jesus goes to Pilate, (27:27) Praetorium, (27:33) to Golgotha and the Cross. He was then put in the Tomb.  Luke has three mentions of the Kingdom- one to the Thief and one about Joseph of Arimathea.

Saturday – Jesus went into Hell and got the Keys back and while He was there He preached and set captives free.

Sunday (Easter) Matthew 28 – the Garden Tomb, (Luke 24:13) Emmaus, (Luke 24:36) the first visit to the Upper Room.

One week later – John 20: 24 + 26 – the Upper Room for the second time for Thomas.

To Galilee – To the mountain and the Sea of Tiberias (Galilee).

Mt. of Olives/Area of Bethany – for the Ascension.

I wrote a post called – After the Cloud to envision what may have taken place next and where He went.

pics –  

Kingdom – On His Way to Jerusalem


This part of the study on Jesus’ Kingdom is going to appear to be rough in its style and appearance, because it is my study format:)

I am looking at Jesus’ movements loosely after the feeding of the 5000.  I want Matthew to be my reference point but Luke and John add interesting movements and stories that need to be added.  I will try to join them as best as I can.  That means I will start in John about five months before Jesus’ Passion.

  1. John 10: 22 has Jesus in Jerusalemat the Feast of Dedication or Hanukkah.  He makes the Jews made so He “escapes”.
  2. Jesus goes to where John baptized on the east bank of the Jordan. John 10: 40.
  3. Bethanyis Jesus’ next destination to raise Lazarus from the dead. John 11: 17
  4. Because of a plot to kill Him He goes to a village called Ephraim that is in the desert.  John 11: 54 We would call it wilderness – English and Hebrew ideas on this topic are opposites of each other. 
  5. Capernaum– dealing with the Temple tax. Matthew 17: 24
  6. Samaria and Galilee border – healed ten lepers. Luke 17: 11
  7. Crosses the Jordan Riverto be on the east bank. Matthew 19: 1
  8. Crosses back to west bank and goes to Jericho.
  9. Goes to Bethany/Bethphage and the Mount of Olivesfor the “Triumphal Entry”. Matthew 21: 1, Luke19: 28

From Capernaum to Jerusalem is about eighty miles. I believe all of this walking was for a reason.  Jesus went to the east bank in order to cross the Jordan, like Joshua, “conquer Jericho” and then proceed to Passover.  Yes, it is out of order from what Joshua did but I still see the symbolism in the travels. 

The Passion From The Psalms


The Psalms are awesome! They are songs that were and still are sung but they are also prophetic.  This post is just a glimpse at all of the foreshadows of Jesus’ life and Passion. David wrote many of the Psalms and this collection is centered in his first book (1 to 41).

I feel that the three prayers Jesus prayed in the Garden are also in Psalms.  I have tried to sort out something that might sound right but the task is huge.

These came from the NIV (more or less), I tend to capitalize pronouns that refer to Jesus/God. 

  • Psalm 40: 7 to 8 – The beginning of Jesus’ ministry – I have come to do Your will 
  • Psalm 40: 9 to 10 – His ministry– I do not hide Your righteousness or conceal Your love
  • Psalm 42: 4 – Triumphal Entry– Leading multitudes to the house of God amid shouts of joy.
  • Psalm 45: 7 – Dinner during Holy Week– Anointed with joy and my robes smell of myrrh, aloes, and cassia.
  • Psalm 35: 14 – tears in the Garden– mourning, bowed my head, weeping
  • Psalm 6: 6 – praying in Garden– worn out from groaning, weeping
  • Psalm 31: 9 – Jesus in Garden– My eyes grow weak with sorrow, soul and body with grief
  • Psalm 10: 2 – Judas /mob– hunt down the weak
  • Psalm 17: 11 – mob– they have tracked Me down to throw Me down
  • Psalm 27: 2,3 – the mob in the Garden– My foes attack me, they will stumble and fall
  • Psalm 41: 9 – Judas– My close friend who shared my bread lifted his heal against me!
  • Psalm 55: 13 to 14 –Judas– my companion, friend, that walked with me 
  • Psalm 10: 15 – Judas– call him to account for his wickedness
  • Psalm 44: 10 – Disciples in the Garden– we retreated before our enemies and they plunder us (young man lost his tunic)
  • Psalm 44: 13,14 – Disciples– You made us a reproach, a scorn, as people shake their heads at us.
  • Psalm 38: 11 – disciples running in the Garden and not being at the cross– friends avoid me because of my wounds, stay far from me
  • Psalm 42: 10 – On the cross/Pharisees– my bones suffer agony while they say, “Where is your God?”
  • Psalm 11: 1 – Pharisees– flee like a bird to the mountains (Luke 13:31)
  • Psalm 41: 6 – Pharisees– They gather slander to spread it abroad
  • Psalm 37: 12 – Council plotting
  • . Psalm 38: 12 – Council– set traps, talk of my ruin
  • Psalm 38: 19+20 – Council/enemies– hate me without reason, repay my good for evil
  • Psalm 13: 4 – Pharisees– enemy will say, “I have overcome Him”
  • Psalm 35: 16 –trial– Pharisees gnashed their teeth
  • Psalm 35: 11 – Jesus’ trial– ruthless witnesses come forward
  • Psalm 38: 2 – Roman beating– arrows pierced me, Your hand came upon me
  • Psalm 38: 7 – Beating– back is filled with pain
  • Psalm 22: 12 – beating– many bulls have surrounded Me
  • Psalm 31: 11 – on road to the cross– those who see Me flee
  • Psalm 22: 16 – the cross– they pierced my hands and feet
  • Psalm 22: 18 – Roman guards– divided my garments cast lots for my clothes
  • Psalm 49: 5+6 – On the cross, why Jesus died– Wicked deceivers surround me, ransom for life is costly, should live forever and not see decay
  • Psalm 14: 7 – Why– Oh, that salvation would come out of Zion
  • Psalm 3: 2 – Pharisees/thief at the cross– many say “God will not deliver Him
  • Psalm 22: 7+8 – at cross– hurl insults, He trust in God let Him deliver Him
  • Psalm 42: 3 – On the Cross/Pharisees– Men say to me all day long, “Where is your God?”
  • Psalm 31: 5 – Jesus on cross– into Your hands I commit my spirit
  • Psalm 22: 1 – Jesus– My God why have You forsaken Me 
  • Psalm 31: 9 to 18 – Part of the pray in the Garden and His trip out of the city
  • Psalm 35: 19 to 26 – prayer in the Garden, trial, and the darkness(26)
  • Psalm 38: 21+22 – in the Garden/on the cross– do not forsake me, come to my help
  • Psalm 39: 9 – Silence– would not open my mouth
  • Psalm 38: 13+14 – Jesus’ silence– cannot open my mouth, offer no reply
  • Psalm 22: 15 – thirst– strength dried up, tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth
  • Psalm 34: 20 – no bones broken(first Passover lamb in Exodus)
  • Psalm 35: 4 to 6 – why darkness– turned back in dismay and their path is dark and slippery
  • Psalm 23: 4 – When Jesus went to Hell– Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death
  • Psalm 40: 1 to 3 – the Resurrection– lift me out of the pit, set my feet on a rock
  • Psalm 16: 10 – Resurrection– the Holy One will not see decay
  • Psalm 17: 15 – Resurrection – In righteousness I will see your face when I awake
  • Psalm 18: 4 to 7 – Resurrection– the earth trembled and quaked (much of Psalm18 talks of things that happened)
  • Psalm 22: 24 – Resurrection– not disdained the suffering of the afflicted One
  • Psalm 19: 3 – Pentecost– no speech or language where their voice is not heard

Yes, I am sure there are others but this is a start.

My Study on Jesus’ Kingdom


This study is going to go on for a while!  I hope to use this page to list links to the post as they are written.  Several TV programs on Christian networks prompted my study, especially one show on the Sid Roth program.  As usual I started with my concordance, dictionaries, and the Bible Gateway app.  I found that Matthew has the most references to the kingdom and Luke is second.  An argument over kingdom of heaven or God had been a big deal.  But since the same stories in different gospels use different terms it hopefully has settled that they are talking about the same thing. 

Much of my study will revolve around the Gospel of Matthew.  Here are my reasons for that decision. 

  • Matthew has the most references/usages of the word kingdom.
  • Matthew was an eye-witness for much of Jesus’ ministry.  So was John and for some of the three years, Mark was there.  The Holy Spirit uses Luke to tell a story from what he had gleaned by talking with other eye-witnesses for a Greek believer; I find story placement in Luke very valuable.  
  • Matthew uses the term kingdom of heaven for his Jewish readers and sprinkles in Kingdom of God at specific times.  The Kingdom of God is used by the other writers, for the most part (it is more of a Greek term).

In reading Matthew and focusing on the word kingdom, I circled the word by using Bible Gateway as an aid, it seemed that there were three sections of teaching on the kingdom. 

  1. The first is Matthew 3: 2 to 8: 12.  
  2. The second is 9: 35 to 13: 52. 
  3. The third block of teachings is 13: 53 to the end of the gospel.  

The first two blocks of teachings start with messages about John the Baptist and Repent.  The third one begins with Jesus going home (Nazareth) and being rejected by the town.

This third block contains the feeding of the 5000, which is in all four Gospels, and covers Holy Week. I will use these two events to frame this third block.  Comparing and injecting teaching/parables and events from the other Gospels that occur during this time is proving interesting. Themes and ideas are repeated but they get more intense with each block.  My next post will be about Joseph of Arimathea (from Luke).  I am starting with the third block because of Holy Week, Passover/Easter, and Pentecost.  I will list and link them from this page.

Joseph of Arimathea – Easter 2019 

The Thief – Easter 2019, On His Way to Jerusalem

On His Way to Heaven